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Keith Born & Moriah Placer - Sophomore Recital

Keith Born & Moriah Placer

Sophomore Duo Percussion Recital

Bliss Hall – Rm. 2222

Thursday April 14, 2011

8:00 p.m.

 

 

Conversation (2010)                                                                                             Bobby Lopez (b. 1978)

 

Conversation for two tambourines is a fun duet for headed tambourines that showcases techniques (both commonplace and otherwise) often found in orchestral tambourine playing. The piece is a running dialog between the two players as they execute articulated grace notes, pianissimo rolls, finger rolls, and a variety of articulations. Conversation brings to the forefront the complexity, control, and variety of techniques that are required to play this instrument well.

 

Keith Born & Moriah Placer, tambourine

 

Preludio No. 1 Mi menor (E minor) (1990)                                                        Ney Rosauro (b. 1952)

 

Prelude No.1 for solo marimba was originally written for guitar, explaining the harmonies from flamenco music, as well as the Spanish mood of the work. The marimba version was completed in 1983 and is dedicated to Rose Braunstein. Throughout its three themes, the spirit of the Spanish music can be felt, and the fingerings of guitar arpeggios are suggested in the third theme.

 

Moriah Placer, marimba

 

Pluto (2011)                                                                                                               Keith Born (b. 1990)                                                                                                                                 

 

Pluto is a solo piece written for orchestral snare drum. It was inspired by Gustav Holst’s Jupiter and Mars. It features a variety of rhythms involved in the two pieces as well as some original ideas intermixed. This piece is meant to challenge the performer as well is allow them to focus and listen to orchestral music.

 

Keith Born, snare drum

 

 

To Zanarkand (2001)                                                                                      Nobuo Uematsu (b. 1959)

              Arr. Keith Born (b. 1990)

 

To Zanarkand is the Main Theme of Final Fantasy X. The theme is first played during the game's opening, which shows Tidus and the others at the ruins of Zanarkand as they prepare to fight their final battle. This theme shares the greatest importance in the soundtrack, being played at various significant plot events in the game.

 

Keith Born & Moriah Placer, vibraphone

 

Bushido: The Way of the Warrior (2006)                                                    John Willmarth (b. 1974)

 

The samurai of Japan were not merely trained assassins but lived by a strict ethical code known as Bushido (literally meaning "the way of the warrior"). This code influenced all aspects of life and is comparable to the Western concept of chivalry. The three movements of this piece represent the Bushido principals of Jin (benevolance), Meiyo (honor and glory) and Yu (courage). Each movement is intended to emphasize a different facet of the timpani and a different aspect of Japanese music.

 

Keith Born, timpani

 

I Remember (1994)                                                                        Traditional West African Rhythms

                                                                                                      Arr. David Schmalenberger (b. 1960)

 

David Schmalenberger is a member of the music faculty at the University of Minnesota-Duluth where he teaches percussion and jazz studies. I Remember is based on two traditional West African dance rhythms. The first section centers around a typical 6/8 bell pattern, presented initially with the shakers, and the second section (the 2/4 material) was influenced by Drum Gahu, recreational dance music from Ghana. While this piece is not a literal transcription of African drumming, the composer hopes that I Remember captures the essence of West African music performance.

 

Concerto for Two Violins in D minor (1730)                                                        J. S. Bach (1685-1750)

I.               Vivace

 

Perhaps one of the most famous works by J. S. Bach and considered among the best examples of the work of the late Baroque period. The concerto is characterized by the subtle yet expressive relationship between the violins (marimbas). The musical structure of this piece uses fugal imitation and much counterpoint.

 

Bach wrote this Double Concerto for Two Violins and Strings at some point during the six years when he worked under the employ of the young Prince Leopold in Anhalt-Cöthen. When Bach died, his music library was divided between his two oldest surviving sons, Wilhelm Friedemann and Carl Philip Emanuel. The pieces that fell into the hands of the former, were eventually lost. The Double Concerto for Two Violins luckily comes down to us through Carl Philip Emanuel Bach, who fortunately bundled together his father’s manuscripts of the solo parts and a set of orchestral parts that finally found its way into the State Library of Berlin.

 

Keith Born & Moriah Placer, marimba

Clay Colley, piano

 

Ode to the Nerd (2011)                                                                                   Arr. Keith Born (b. 1990)

 

Ode to the Nerd is a medley of pieces featured in familiar tunes from older Nintendo video games. It futures Zelda, Pokémon, Star fox 64, The Ocarina of Time, Tetris, and Mario. The main idea of this piece is to show that music is everywhere and that even a catchy tune can be heard in the most unusual places. I would like to thank Dr. Stephen Reale for his help with this arrangement.   

 

Keith Born, vibraphone

Moriah Placer, marimba

Eric Zalenski, bass marimba

Josh Colson, percussion

Dylan Kollat, drum set

 

Biographies:

 

Keith Born is a sophomore music education major at Youngstown State University’s Dana School of Music. Keith, originally from Bethel Park, Pennsylvania, graduated from Bethel Park High School in 2008. While in high school Keith played in the Symphonic Band, Wind Ensemble, Concert Band, Marching Band, Percussion Ensemble and was in the pit orchestra for the musicals. Keith has also sung with the concert choir and Bethel Park Top 21.

 During his time at Dana, Keith has studied percussion under Dr. Glenn Schaft. He has also performed with the Concert Band, Marching Band, Dana Symphony Orchestra, The Percussion Ensemble, University Chorus, and has played in the Pit for The Bakers Wife.  

Keith will be serving as the percussion coordinator for East Palestine High School in Ohio. Keith is a member of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, The Youngstown Percussion Collective, and The Percussive Arts Society.

 

Moriah Placer is a sophomore music education major at Youngstown State University’s Dana School of Music. Moriah was born and raised in Warren, Ohio, and graduated in 2009 from Warren G. Harding High School where she was a member of the Symphonic Band, Marching Band, Jazz Ensemble, and performed at the OMEA District V Solo and Ensemble Contest. She also performed with the Youngstown State District V Honors Band, and Kent State Honors Band. During her senior year, she studied percussion with Kevin Kifer and now at YSU, she studies with Dr. Glenn Schaft. While at Dana so far, Moriah has performed with the Wind Ensemble, Concert Band, Dana Symphony and Chamber Orchestra, Percussion Ensemble, Marching Band, and the University Symphonic Band. She also serves as secretary of the Youngstown Percussion Collective, and is a member of the Percussive Arts Society. Outside of the University, Moriah has served as the percussion instructor at Mathews High School in Vienna, Ohio, marched with an exhibition group in Winter Guard International, and was involved with the Warren Junior Military Band.

Moriah would like to dedicate this performance to her late grandmother, Betty Marie Placer.

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